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PERSONAL INJURY LAWYERS – CAREERS

Law Clerk – Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

We are a boutique law firm specializing in personal injury law. We are looking for someone to join our amazing team. The candidate must be familiar with plaintiff personal injury litigation and medical malpractice claims. A minimum of 2-5 years experience is preferred. The successful candidate will be working directly for a lawyer and have full carriage of their own files. Exceptional communication and organization skills are required, as well as the ability to work well under minimal supervision in a fast paced environment.

Primary Duties Include:

 

  • Processing new files
  • Preparing court documents, pleadings & correspondence (including undertakings)
  • Direct contact with clients and lawyer
  • Full carriage of files to forward them the litigation

 

Required Experience/Skills/Qualifications:

 

  • 2-5 years of Personal Injury/Medical Malpractice experience within a law firm
  • Law Clerk / ILCO Certification
  • Superior organization and time management skills
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills
  • Knowledge of both tort and accident benefits claims

 

Legal Assistant and Law Clerk
Responsibilities:

 

  • File management, organization and corresponding with clients and defence counsel
  • Preparing affidavit of documents, statements of claim, briefs and other Civil Litigation forms for filing and service
  • Opening files, requesting productions, organizing lawyer’s calendar, scheduling discoveries, mediations and other events
  • Dealing with undertakings and service of documents
  • Dealing with clients in a professional manner

 

Qualifications:

 

  • At least one year of experience as an assistant and/or clerk
  • Experience in personal injury litigation
  • Highly organized with a strong attention to detail
  • Ability to work with minimum supervision, with special attention to deadlines

 

Free Consultation Form

Proposed impaired driving bill hits roadblock in Senate

The federal government’s bid to enact strict new impaired driving rules alongside its marijuana legalization bill hit a major snag last month when the Senate’s legal and constitutional affairs committee voted to remove a key provision in the legislation. The move divided lawmakers, legal experts, road safety advocates, and Ontario personal injury lawyers.

Bill C-46 was introduced as a companion to Bill C-45, the bill to legalize the use of recreational marijuana in Canada. In addition to addressing issues around marijuana-impaired driving, Bill C-46 proposes allowing police officers to conduct random roadside breathalyzer tests without probable suspicion of impairment.

The provision is controversial, as Ontario personal injury lawyers can understand. Some legal experts believe it violates Canada’s Charter of Rights and “would lead to a decade of Charter challenge litigation,” according to Sen. Denise Batters, who proposed eliminating the provision. Activists have also suggested it would enable police to unfairly target minority communities.

Supporters of the bill see it as essential to ensuring safety on Canadian roads following the legalization of recreational cannabis. According to the National Post, more than 40 countries have enacted random roadside testing programs and experienced reductions in impaired driving fatalities of up to 36 per cent. When Conservative MP Steven Blaney proposed similar legislation in 2016, it received near-unanimous support in the House of Commons and praise from Mother Against Drunk Driving (MADD). Many personal injury lawyers in Ontario believe the policy could significantly improve road safety in the province.

Some of the bill’s supporters believe that politics, not constitutional concerns, inspired the committee’s decision. The Conservative Party of Canada has emphatically opposed the Liberals’ efforts to legalize marijuana, and it was Conservative senators who spearheaded the committee’s vote. Indeed, Sen. Jean-Guy Dagenais, who voted to eliminate the roadside testing provision, was an early and vocal proponent of Steven Blaney’s bill just two years ago.

“It appears as though obstruction of the policy agenda of the government of Canada is of higher priority than consistency of policy position,” said Sen. Peter Harder, the government’s representative in the Senate.

“This is shocking,” added MADD CEO Andrew Murie, according to the Post. “You kind of wonder if this is based on what they say is legal concerns or is this politics being played out?”

After much debate, the Senate voted in June not to reinstate mandatory roadside testing. The amended bill will now move to the House of Commons, where it will likely be rejected and returned to the Senate. This cumbersome process may delay the bill’s passage, meaning Bill C-45 could be passed without accompanying impaired driving legislation, which puts road users at risk.

If you’ve been injured in an impaired driving accident, contact Neinstein Personal Injury Lawyers’ team of Ontario personal injury lawyers to arrange a free, no-obligation consultation. We can help you understand your legal situation and provide guidance as you pursue fair and reasonable compensation for your injuries.

 

Image credit: Coolcaesar at the English language Wikipedia

 

Who is responsible for rising pedestrian fatalities?

Almost every Toronto personal injury lawyer has, at some point, fielded an inquiry relating to a vulnerable road user being struck by a vehicle. In Canada’s biggest city, cyclists, pedestrians, and motor vehicles all share limited space on the roads. As the city has grown, this arrangement has led to tensions and, unfortunately, a rising number of serious injuries and fatalities.

City planners, local politicians, and victims’ advocates have all proposed solutions to Toronto’s road safety woes, including increased funding for public transit programs, infrastructure updates, harsher penalties for dangerous driving, and stricter enforcement of existing traffic laws. Several months ago, Liberal MPP Yvan Baker even proposed the “Phones Down, Heads Up Act,” a so-called ‘zombie law’ targeting pedestrians who use their smartphones in crosswalks.

The Phones Down, Heads Up Act was an outlier; safety measures designed to protect vulnerable road users rarely target pedestrian behaviours. But in a recent Toronto Star editorial, contributor Royson James suggested that maybe they should.

Pedestrians in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) “exhibit a wanton disregard and disrespect of the car as a killing machine,” Royson writes. He posits that a healthy fear of automobiles and a sense of responsibility for one’s own safety would contribute to a decrease in pedestrian injuries in Toronto.

“Narrow sidewalks. Poor street design. Lack of safe cycling space. Insufficient speed controls. Inattentive drivers. These are some of the frequently cited reasons for the carnage on our streets when pedestrians, cyclists and motor vehicles converge,” Royson says. “We should loudly, boldly resolutely address another, less politically correct reason – the culture of pedestrian disrespect of the car as an agent of danger and death.”

However, in a separate Star editorial, Edward Keenan points out that the stats don’t back up claims that pedestrians are ultimately to blame for their injuries. He cites a May 2018 report from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, an American organization, that found that problematic road design and an increase in large passenger vehicles were primarily to blame for spiking pedestrian fatalities in that country.

If you were to ask a Toronto personal injury lawyer, they might tell you that the best solution to surging pedestrian fatalities is a mix of infrastructure updates, changes to the rules of the road, and public messaging campaigns that promote awareness among pedestrians. Blaming vulnerable road users for the dangers they face may be irresponsible, but asking them to take reasonable precautions is not.

If you have been injured in a road accident in Toronto, contact Neinstein Personal Injury Lawyers today to arrange a free, no-obligation consultation with an experienced Toronto personal injury lawyer. Our team can help you understand your legal options and put you in touch with leading medical and rehabilitative care providers. At Neinstein, your recovery comes first.

 

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